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3D printing and cloud-based software helps it weather the COVID-19 storm

Relativity Space’s focus on 3D printing and cloud-based software helps it weather the COVID-19 storm "Just like in almost every other industry, there’s been a rash of layoffs among newer space startups and companies amid the novel coronavirus crisis. But Relativity Space has managed to avoid layoffs — and is even hiring, despite the global pandemic. Relativity CEO and founder Tim Ellis cites the company’s focus on large-scale 3D printing and its adoption of cloud-based tools and technologies as big reasons why his startup hasn’t felt the pinch. Because Relativity’s forthcoming launch vehicle is almost entirely made up of 3D-printed parts, from the engines to the fuselage and everything in between, the company has been able to continue producing its prototypes essentially uninterrupted. Relativity has been classified an essential business, as have most companies operating in anything related to aerospace or defense, but Ellis said that they took steps very early to address the potential threat of COVID-19 and ensure the health and safety of their staff. As early as March 9, when the disease was really first starting to show up in the U.S. and before any formal restrictions or shelter-in-place orders were in effect, Relativity was recommending that employees work from home where possible. “We’re able to do that, partially because with our automated printing technology we were able to have very, very few people in the factory and still keep printers running,” Ellis said in an interview. “We actually even have just one person now running several printers that are still actually printing — it’s literally a single person operating, while a lot of the company has been able to make progress working from home for the last couple of weeks.” Being able to run an entire production factory floor with just one person on-site is a tremendous competitive advantage in the current ...
Free software during COVID-19

Free software during COVID-19 – good spirit or clever business?

Free software during COVID-19 – good spirit or clever business "Businesses have been thrown into new ways of working – never before have entire industries together felt this kind of external disruption. There’s no denying that many many companies were blindsided by a sudden shift in operating modes but, overall, businesses have queen quick to adapt to the situational demands, in a big part owed to their resolve and strength of their workforce, but in no small part thanks to the tools available to ‘go digital’. Whether it’s e-commerce solutions or cloud MSPs, the market is exploding with vendors, all of which can help businesses regain a viable course now, and in the post-Covid economy. Of course, these digital solutions aren’t cheap, and given times of financial uncertainty, many firms aren’t in a position to stump up the costs. That said, unprecedented circumstances lead to unprecedented responses; the current economic crisis has led to admirable acts as businesses look to lend to their support to others, and enterprise technology is no different. COVID-19 has been a great leveller, and many businesses in a stronger position have chosen to show charity to support to members of the industry sectors they, in a better economy, are built on. “Significance not success” is the unofficial motto of many businesses right now, who know that while business may temporarily be halted, they can support their user-base through the hard times, and keep relationships and their own brand perception strengthened for the longer term. Many of these companies are offering collaborative tools, automation software, password managers and security solutions for free, with some allowing use of tools for as long as six months. Vendors are now showing that they can live up to their promise of being enterprise ‘partners’ when they need them most. Companies like Google, Salesforce, and Atlassian are offering their collaborative and productivity ...
Biggest Searches of Lockdown

The Biggest Searches of Lockdown so far

The biggest searches of lockdown so far "New data has revealed that some businesses are dealing with lockdown life better than others. Security firm Redscan has revealed a report detailing the top Google search trends since restrictions came into force several weeks ago, showing exactly what organizations are searching for online. Perhaps unsurprisingly, software and remote working tools top the list, with queries around VPN software, antivirus and collaboration tools such as Zoom all ranking highly as companies aim to help their workers be productive out of the office. Lockdown search However, Redscan also found that searches for “Business continuity plan” saw a huge spike between March 8 and March 21, far higher than any other time in Google’s history. Search interest in “remote working”, “collaboration tools and “remote access” reached record highs in March, as did queries for "VPN" and "Antivirus". The report revealed that Zoom is currently the most searched online collaboration technology, ahead of Microsoft Teams, Slack and WebEx. Despite a number of high-profile recent security and privacy issues, searches for all the top collaboration tools saw a significant spike in online search interest during the month. “Google’s search data tells a clear story of businesses trying to adapt to remote working and related security and technology challenges of greatest concern,” said Redscan CTO Mark Nicholls. “A spike in business continuity plan searches is hardly a surprise, but it is also troubling to think that so many are Googling the term now. It suggests that many businesses did not already have a continuity plan in place, and now is hardly an ideal time to implement one. But better late than never. “Ensuring that employees have the tools in place to work from home has been a priority of IT teams but it’s important that organisations are vigilant about the increased security risks and put appropriate controls and processes in place to mitigate ...
How COVID-19 will change Software Development

Software development after COVID-19

How COVID-19 will change Software Development? "Pandemics are not the “new normal” for the human race. As with practically every other type of disaster, we’ve survived them countless times in the past. But there’s no doubt we’re living and working through an emergency situation right now. As we try to avoid exposing ourselves to the novel coronavirus, we must also prevent our working lives from stalling out completely. For most professionals, remote collaboration will be our primary fallback method until normality returns. Tech marketing is in crisis Working remotely can be awkward when your productivity depends on being able to share a physical space with others for at least a few hours per day or week. Tech marketers have been hit particularly hard because a large part of their annual cycles are aligned with conferences and other industry events, most of which have been canceled, postponed, or made entirely virtual. Indeed, I’ve noticed far fewer tech product releases in the past few months than in a normal spring season. This goes against the pattern I’ve seen practically every year since I entered the IT field in the mid-1980s. Typically, a burst of launches grabs everyone’s attention from late February through early June, until an equal or larger batch of vendor announcements in the fall takes the spotlight." Read More Ready to start learning virtually today? Chat with us below. Source: infoworld ...

How covid-19 will change the global business climate

How COVID-19 will change the global business climate? "COVID-19 is threatening livelihoods as well as lives. Our cover this week examines the disaster the disease is unleashing in the business world. Countries accounting for more than half of global GDP are in lockdown. The International Labour Organisation estimates that industries in which the risk of lay-offs or furloughs is high employ 1.25bn people. The exit from lockdowns will be halting and precarious. And the calamity will have lasting effects, accelerating existing trends: the adoption of new technology; a rethinking of global supply chains; and the rise of well-connected oligopolies. Big companies are better placed not only to survive the crisis but to tap governments for support. At least banks are entering this crisis in far better shape than the last one. Some may struggle nonetheless. Amid the extraordinary turbulence the pandemic has caused in financial markets, the plunge in oil prices stands out. They fell by more than half in March, as demand collapsed and a price war raged between Saudi Arabia and Russia (on April 9th OPEC and Russia made a truce and agreed to cut production, but prices fell nonetheless). The Russians and (especially) the Saudis can withstand low prices, but other producers are hurting. Those include shale firms in America, the world’s biggest producer, but also poorer oil-dependent countries, such as Iraq. Oil provides 90% of Iraq’s state revenue. Even a doubling of its price would still leave a wide budget deficit. Iraq’s cash reserves may not last the year. And as if near-bankruptcy were not enough to contend with, its politics are in chaos and militias are running amok." Read More Ready to start learning virtually today? Chat with us below.   Source: economist ...

Coronavirus Affects The Women’s Workforce

  Will the pandemic change the workforce for women? "When it comes to finances, it is women who will take the biggest hit from the coronavirus pandemic, according to a new report by PayScale. With many schools closed, women are the ones who tend to take time away from work to care for their children, as well as elderly parents or family members who are at risk or confined. When they seek to return to work, they’ll receive an offer that is 7% less than a candidate who is currently employed when applying for the same position, PayScale’s 2020 State of the Gender Pay Gap report said. “The coronavirus pandemic has really exposed these cultural faults with our economic system,” said Sudarshan Sampath, PayScale’s director of research." For those women returning to the workforce, “there is a strong likelihood they will not get rehired or they’ll come back on reduced terms,” he said. Even if women aren’t taking time away to help out their family, they may have lost their job due to business shutdowns caused by COVID-19. “Women are over-represented in the low-paid service economy jobs that are really getting slammed right now with layoffs,” said Emily Martin, vice president of education and workplace justice at the National Women’s Law Center." Read More Join Us For Our Women In Tech Event this August.  Source: cnbc ...

How To Stay Calm In Stressful Situation

The world is changing right now. With many uncertainties, things can become stressful and overwhelming.  Here are tips to help you stay calm in stressful situations: 1. Slow down. If possible, don’t react immediately. Instead, be patient and collect as much information as possible. Ask yourself, Is this really going to matter a year from now? If the answer is yes, step back to remove yourself somewhat from the situation. Instead of seeing yourself as an active participant, try to view yourself as a representative of your company. This perspective will help you remain less emotional and improve your ability to make decisions. 2. Stay positive. When stressful situations occur, your mind may go in a thousand directions and some of your thoughts may be negative. The more your mind wanders, the more difficult it will be for you to remain calm. Stop yourself from beginning to imagine the worst-case scenario. Instead, let go of negative thoughts and refocus your mind on something positive, no matter how small.   3. Never ask “what if?” This worst question you could ask yourself or others in the middle of a crisis begins with "what if." This line of questioning induces sheer panic and forces you to process situations that have not occurred and may never happen. “What if” questions compound the fear and escalate the problem. Say your company has failed to deliver a project on time. Your first instinct may be to think, What if my client decides to hire someone else? That thought could easily lead to the question "What if I don’t make payroll this month?" Instead, focus on the facts and work on a solution.    Read More Ready to start your virtual education? Chat with us below! Source: Entrepreneur ...

Ready For Virtual Career Fairs?

Ready For Virtual Career Fairs? "Virtual career fairs and events, fully-remote recruiting, more personalized career paths, and greater insights into candidate experiences are quickly becoming the new normal in a post-COVID-19 world. The COVID-19 pandemic is quickly changing how every organization is attracting, recruiting, and retaining employees on their virtual teams, making remote work the new normal. Recruiting systems, Applicant Tracking Systems (ATS), and talent management systems were designed for one-on-one personal interactions, not virtual ones. Legacy Human Resource Management (HRM) systems are already showing signs of not being able to scale and meet the challenges of the brave, new post-COVID-19 world. The majority of legacy systems are built for transaction scale and can’t see candidate potential. Closing the gaps between legacy talent management systems and new virtual event recruiting and AI-based talent management platforms are changing that by putting candidate potential at the center of their architectures." Read More Ready to start your virtual education? Chat with us below! Source: Forbes ...

Virtual Learning is the new norm

Virtual Learning is the new norm.  "In recent days, I’ve been reflecting on my time as a policy advisor to the United States House of Representatives Committee on Education and the Workforce in 2003, when we wrestled with how and whether to waive Department of Education regulations to aid in the growth of distance education. How could we balance vital consumer protections, and the responsibility of safeguarding federal aid, with the promise of connecting an unprecedented number of students with vital education and training through online modalities? Members of Congress resisted expanding the Distance Education Demonstration Program (DEDP), or even memorializing in statute what the demonstration program was teaching us about how students and institutions were experimenting with promising new technologies. At that time, policymakers were concerned about maintaining quality and ensuring academic integrity. Equity and access concerns were paramount. Many of the institutions participating in distance education at that time were also for-profit providers and policymakers had a level of increased scrutiny about their motivations. Fast forward seventeen years, and policymakers and institutions are again grappling with the promise and the peril of moving higher education online. We know that an institution’s transition to online education is neither quick nor seamless. It takes intense coordination and planning among administrators, faculty and instructional designers. Students’ transition to online learning (even for digital natives) is not without challenges either. Many students—like the ones profiled by Digital US, a national coalition of 25 community organizations and employers working to support digital skill development—struggle with consistent access to devices, internet, or tech support, and are unfamiliar or uncomfortable learning online." Read More Ready to start your virtual education? Chat with us below!   Source: Forbes ...
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